Friday, November 15, 2013

Battle at Fish Creek/Battle of Tourond's Coulee

The battle of fish creek is a National Historic Site - here is a bit of history...

 "Battle of Touronds Coulee/Fish Creek is of national historic significance because: at this place occurred a military engagement of the North West Rebellion /Métis Resistance between Middleton’s North West Field Force and Gabriel Dumont’s Métis and First Nations forces. In the 1880s, people of western Canada, particularly Métis and some First Nations, were alarmed by the Dominion of Canada’s plan, as part of Canada’s National Policy, to survey lands of the Canadian west with a new grid land system to accommodate immigration and new settlement. With their concerns not being recognized by the federal government and tensions mounting, the Métis, led by Louis Riel and Gabriel Dumont, declared a provisional government at Batoche to have a voice and formally negotiate with the Canadian government. The provisional government declaration was seen as a revolt by the Canadian government that would be addressed through confrontation. The Métis provisional government, increasingly frustrated by the lack of response to negotiate from Ottawa, began to prepare and arm for the protection of their lands. The Métis encounter with and defeat of North West Mounted Police at Duck Lake on March 26, 1885, convinced the Canadian government that the police force was inadequate to quell the insurgency. The North West Field Force, made up of Canadian militia from eastern Canada and Manitoba and led by General Frederick Middleton, was thus created and dispatched forth to Batoche in the North West Territories – the heart of the Métis homeland. " 

Taken from: http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/lhn-nhs/sk/tourond/natcul/histo.aspx

I drove out to this site a few years back to visit it. Of course the site only consists of a plaque, lots of grass and of course fish creek. Sounds exciting right? Well you may be surprised, we often forget about locations where battles once took place. They may just be grassy fields now with no remains or evidence of what took place but they are a huge part of our history and with history that contains battles how could there be no energy? I believe that there is always residual energy at these locations - you may not see a spirit just wandering around but you can feel a definite change when you are walking around the site. I always like to think about what it may have been like when the site was packed with people. What a site it must have been. I never had a fascinating paranormal experience at this site but I have thought about going back at night.. just to see if you may hear something other than the rustling grass in the wind.